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Join NASA's Chemtrail Count-a-thon!

From: Lydia Mancini <lydia@bariumblues.com>
http://educate-yourself.org/cn/nasachemtrailcount04may04.shtml
May 4, 2004

Join NASA's Chemtrail Count-a-thon ! (http://www.globe.gov/fsl/html/templ.cgi?earthday2004)

http://www.globe.gov/fsl/html/templ.cgi?earthday2004

No kidding -- This is brainwashing propaganda at its finest: School children help NASA count chemtrails on Earth Day in order “to increase their understanding of the Earth”.

~~Lydia

http://www.globe.gov/fsl/html/templ.cgi?earthday2004

http://www.registerguard.com./news/2004/05/02/ol.contrails.0502.html

In honor of Earth Day, the GLOBE Program invites you to join in a scientific experiment on April 22, 2004, to count contrails in your piece of the sky. Teachers, students, and anyone interested in helping to develop a better understanding of the Earth are welcome to participate.

About the Activity

Welcome to the web site for the GLOBE Program's 2004 Earth Day Contrail Count-a-Thon. GLOBE has partnered with scientists at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to design a project that will allow you to: contrails

* Collect data about the contrails and clouds that you see in the sky following directions given in the Contrail Count-a-Thon Student Worksheet and recording your data on a printout of the Data Sheet.
* Since Earth Day is over, but you would still like to send your data collected on April 22nd, please send it to the GLOBE Help Desk (help@globe.gov).

Why Should You Participate?

Clouds are the largest variable controlling Earth's atmospheric temperature and climate. Any change in global cloud cover may contribute to long-term changes in Earth's climate. Likewise, any change in Earth's climate may have effects on natural resources. Contrails, especially persistent contrails, represent a human-caused increase in the Earth's cloudiness, and are likely to be affecting climate and ultimately our natural resources.

contrailsStudent observers can collaborate with scientists by observing contrails in their area and reporting on the amount and type of contrails present. The results could help atmospheric scientists determine the atmospheric conditions when persistent contrails form and thus help them predict where they will form and possibly assist air traffic managers in planning different flight-paths or altitudes to avoid contrail formation.

By participating in this special Earth Day activity you will be able to learn about contrails and clouds, plus help scientists to increase their knowledge of clouds around the world!

Background Information and Learning Activities:

cloudsBefore you and your students begin collecting cloud and contrail data, it is important that you have an understanding of clouds and their properties. The GLOBE Cloud Protocols contain some great background information about clouds and contrails and why we study them. Visit the Contrail Education Website for more information on contrails.
o Observing, Describing, and Identifying Clouds
o Cloud Watch

Collecting Data:

The steps involved in collecting data are given in the Student Worksheet. You will need to printout a copy of the Data Sheet to record your findings on.

Some items on the Student Worksheet may not be appropriate for the age level of your students, or your location. Just fill out the sections that are relevant to you. At the bottom of the Data Sheet you will find a section for additional comments. In this section you can include any further observations that you may have about the contrails and clouds that you observe. You can collect and report data from as many sites as you wish. It is best to use a separate printout of the Data Sheet for every site that you collect data at.

Reporting the Data that you Collect:

reporting dataAfter you have collected your data, you share it with others by entering it in the Online Data Entry Form. This Online Data Entry Form is designed to correspond to the data sheet that you entered your data on to make it easy to enter data.

Sharing data is an essential step in performing real science, and by reporting your data you are helping to increase the knowledge that exists about contrails and clouds.

Doing More with GLOBE:

GLOBE StudentsBesides studying clouds, students at the over 14,000 GLOBE schools in 105 countries can collect and share data about the atmosphere, hydrology, soil, land cover biology, and Earth systems. Over 10 million GLOBE measurements have been reported, so far. These measurements are available to the public and are used by students and scientists alike to learn more about the environment.

Through participating in GLOBE, students become engaged in science by doing genuine hands-on investigations. To learn more this exciting program, please look through our Learn About GLOBE page and feel free to tour through the web site at www.globe.gov.

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2004 May 05 13:49 UT
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The GLOBE Program - Earth Day 2004 - Contrail Count-a-Thon
In honor of Earth Day, the GLOBE Program invites you to join in a scientific experiment on April 22, 2004, to count contrails in your piece of the sky. Teachers, students, and anyone interested in helping to develop a better understanding of the Earth are welcome to participate.

About the Activity

Welcome to the web site for the GLOBE Program's 2004 Earth Day Contrail Count-a-Thon. GLOBE has partnered with scientists at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to design a project that will allow you to: contrails

* Collect data about the contrails and clouds that you see in the sky following directions given in the Contrail Count-a-Thon Student Worksheet and recording your data on a printout of the Data Sheet.
* Since Earth Day is over, but you would still like to send your data collected on April 22nd, please send it to the GLOBE Help Desk (help@globe.gov).

Why Should You Participate?

Clouds are the largest variable controlling Earth's atmospheric temperature and climate. Any change in global cloud cover may contribute to long-term changes in Earth's climate. Likewise, any change in Earth's climate may have effects on natural resources. Contrails, especially persistent contrails, represent a human-caused increase in the Earth's cloudiness, and are likely to be affecting climate and ultimately our natural resources.

contrailsStudent observers can collaborate with scientists by observing contrails in their area and reporting on the amount and type of contrails present. The results could help atmospheric scientists determine the atmospheric conditions when persistent contrails form and thus help them predict where they will form and possibly assist air traffic managers in planning different flight-paths or altitudes to avoid contrail formation.

By participating in this special Earth Day activity you will be able to learn about contrails and clouds, plus help scientists to increase their knowledge of clouds around the world!

Background Information and Learning Activities:

cloudsBefore you and your students begin collecting cloud and contrail data, it is important that you have an understanding of clouds and their properties. The GLOBE Cloud Protocols contain some great background information about clouds and contrails and why we study them. Visit the Contrail Education Website for more information on contrails.
o Observing, Describing, and Identifying Clouds
o Cloud Watch

Collecting Data:

The steps involved in collecting data are given in the Student Worksheet. You will need to printout a copy of the Data Sheet to record your findings on.

Some items on the Student Worksheet may not be appropriate for the age level of your students, or your location. Just fill out the sections that are relevant to you. At the bottom of the Data Sheet you will find a section for additional comments. In this section you can include any further observations that you may have about the contrails and clouds that you observe. You can collect and report data from as many sites as you wish. It is best to use a separate printout of the Data Sheet for every site that you collect data at.

Reporting the Data that you Collect:

reporting dataAfter you have collected your data, you share it with others by entering it in the Online Data Entry Form. This Online Data Entry Form is designed to correspond to the data sheet that you entered your data on to make it easy to enter data.

Sharing data is an essential step in performing real science, and by reporting your data you are helping to increase the knowledge that exists about contrails and clouds.

Doing More with GLOBE:

GLOBE StudentsBesides studying clouds, students at the over 14,000 GLOBE schools in 105 countries can collect and share data about the atmosphere, hydrology, soil, land cover biology, and Earth systems. Over 10 million GLOBE measurements have been reported, so far. These measurements are available to the public and are used by students and scientists alike to learn more about the environment.

Through participating in GLOBE, students become engaged in science by doing genuine hands-on investigations. To learn more this exciting program, please look through our Learn About GLOBE page and feel free to tour through the web site at www.globe.gov.

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Questions/Comments regarding the GLOBE Program

GLOBE is managed by UCAR/CSU with support from NASA, NSF, the US Dept. of State, and other cooperating organizations.

NASA's Chemtrail/Contrail Con Job (Oct. 13, 2004)


 

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